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Installation

The package distribution files are ``flat'' Apple package files. This is a different format from the release files for Generation 3, which were tarred/gzipped Apple package directories. As an alternative to using wr_install, one can use Apple's installer (click on the listing icon in the Finder).

The installation procedure is pretty much the same as under Unix/Linux. As under Unix/Linux (but not Windows) the Xic and WRspice programs can make use of a separate license server, and all of the workgroup configuration options apply. Similarly, due to the X-Windows support, graphical operation from remote OS X systems is possible, unlike under Windows.

There are two differences from the Linux releases.

  1. The programs use the GTK-2 graphical interface toolkit for display, which is supplied in a separate ``gtk2-bundle-x11'' distribution file. As in Windows, the bundle supplies all of the libraries and supporting files needed, as they are not native to OS X. The user will need to download and install the bundle package. Once installed, it should rarely if ever need to be upgraded. The bundle can be installed with the wr_install script, or with Apple's installer, the same as the program distribution files.

  2. The program installation location can not be changed. The programs will be installed under /usr/local/xictools, and the bundle is installed under /usr/local/gtk2-bundle-x11.

The user must have root permission to install the programs. If a root password has been defined, the user can use ``su'' to become root as in Unix/Linux. Otherwise, there is a ``sudo'' command that can be issued which provides temporary root privileges to certain pre-designated users. From a command line, one can use sudo to execute commands that require root privileges. The user is asked for their password, and the command is executed if the password is accepted.

The sudo command is built into the wr_install script, so that users should not need to become root explicitly to perform updates. To edit configuration files in the installation, root access is needed. The sudo command can be used to start the license server, if running the server is necessary.


next up previous contents index
Next: Un-Installation Up: Apple OS X Notes Previous: Apple OS X Notes   Contents   Index
Stephen R. Whiteley 2017-04-09